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The Boys, Part II

Today’s post is a continuation of last week’s post, “The Boys.” Last week, I took a look at the Buslee and Brodie crews as they were composed on the September 28, 1944 mission to Magdeburg. This week, I want to look at the two crews as they were originally formed, with one exception. I am including two bombardiers for the Buslee crew. The original bombardier was killed on the crew’s second mission, so I am also including the crew’s replacement bombardier.

Both crews were originally made up of ten members. The crews each trained with two flexible, or waist, gunners. At their base at Grafton Underwood, England, by the Fall of 1944, a B-17 crew flew missions with only one flexible/waist gunner, meaning only nine members of the crew flew at one time. I imagine that this was one of the first stressful situations faced by the crews, knowing that the close connection the ten had made with each other in training was jeopardized. One man, one waist gunner, was going to have to fly with a different crew. I’ll look into how that played out for the Buslee and Brodie crews.

These are the two crews as they were originally assigned to the 384th Bomb Group:

The Buslee Crew of the 544th Bomb Squadron

PILOT John Oliver Buslee, original Buslee crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

John Oliver Buslee

CO-PILOT David Franklin Albrecht, original Buslee crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

David Franklin Albrecht

NAVIGATOR Chester Anthony Rybarczyk, original Buslee crew member, completed tour

BOMBARDIER Marvin Fryden, original Buslee crew member, KIA 8/5/1944 on the crew’s second mission

Possibly Marvin Fryden (if not, James Davis)

BOMBARDIER James Buford Davis, replacement for Marvin Fryden, completed tour

James Buford Davis

RADIO OPERATOR Sebastiano Joseph Peluso, original Buslee crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

Sebastiano Joseph Peluso

ENGINEER/TOP TURRET GUNNER Clarence Benjamin “Ben” Seeley, original Buslee crew member, completed tour

Clarence Benjamin “Ben” Seeley

BALL TURRET GUNNER Erwin Vernon Foster, original Buslee crew member, completed tour

Erwin Vernon Foster

TAIL GUNNER Eugene Daniel Lucynski, original Buslee crew member, WIA (wounded in action) 9/19/1944

Eugene Daniel Lucynski

FLEXIBLE/WAIST GUNNER Lenard Leroy Bryant, original Buslee crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

Bryant was originally assigned as a flexible/waist gunner with the Buslee crew and flew on the crew’s first mission. He alternated with the crew’s other waist gunner, George Edwin Farrar, who flew the crew’s second mission. When Clarence “Ben” Seeley was seriously wounded on the crew’s second mission, Bryant took his place in the top turret for the remainder of the Buslee crew’s missions.

Lenard Leroy Bryant

FLEXIBLE GUNNER George Edwin Farrar, original Buslee crew member, POW Stalag Luft IV 9/28/1944

George Edwin Farrar

The Brodie Crew of the 545th Bomb Squadron

PILOT James Joseph Brodie, original Brodie crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

James Joseph Brodie

CO-PILOT Lloyd Oliver Vevle, original Brodie crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

Lloyd Oliver Vevlve

NAVIGATOR George Marshall Hawkins, Jr., original Brodie crew member, POW Obermassfeld Hospital #1249 (served Stalag 9-C)

No photo available

BOMBARDIER William Douglas Barnes, Jr., original Brodie crew member, completed tour

William Douglas Barnes, Jr.

RADIO OPERATOR William Edson Taylor, original Brodie crew member, POW Stalag Luft IV 10/5/1944

No photo available

ENGINEER/TOP TURRET GUNNER Robert Doyle Crumpton, original Brodie crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

Robert Doyle Crumpton

BALL TURRET GUNNER Gordon Eugene Hetu, original Brodie crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

No photo available

TAIL GUNNER Wilfred Frank Miller, original Brodie crew member, POW Stalag Luft IV

No photo available

FLEXIBLE/WAIST GUNNER Leonard Wood Opie, original Brodie crew member, TBD (to be determined)

Opie and the other Brodie crew waist gunner, Harry Liniger, alternated flying waist with the Brodie crew in the month of August 1944. Opie flew only three missions with the crew and his record with the 384th ends there. The remainder of his WWII service remains unknown.

No photo available

FLEXIBLE/WAIST GUNNER Harry Allen Liniger, original Brodie crew member, POW Stalag Luft IV

Harry Allen Liniger

Five of the enlisted men of the Brodie crew

Far left: Harry Allen Liniger, Waist/Flexible Gunner on the James J. Brodie Crew

I have connected with many children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, great-nieces, and great-nephews of these boys. If I have not connected with you yet, and you are related to any of them, please comment or e-mail me. If anyone can provide pictures of those I don’t have yet, that would be greatly appreciated. They all deserve to be honored for their service and their fight for our freedom.

Original crew lists provided by the 384th Bomb Group.

© Cindy Farrar Bryan and The Arrowhead Club, 2017

The Boys

On September 28, 1944, the Lead Banana, manned by the Buslee crew, and the Lazy Daisy, manned by the Brodie crew collided after coming off the target at Magdeburg, Germany. Neither crew of the 384th Bomb Group was the original crew as assigned.

That day, the Buslee crew was made up of five original crew members and four fill-ins. The Brodie crew was made up of seven original members and two fill-ins.

These are the two crews as they were that day:

The Buslee crew aboard Lead Banana, 544th Bomb Squad

PILOT John Oliver Buslee, original Buslee crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

John Oliver Buslee

CO-PILOT David Franklin Albrecht, original Buslee crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

David Franklin Albrecht

NAVIGATOR William Alvin Henson II, Gerald Sammons crew, KIA 9/28/1944

William Alvin Henson II

BOMBARDIER Robert Sumner Stearns, Larkin Durden crew, KIA 9/28/1944

No photo available

RADIO OPERATOR Sebastiano Joseph Peluso, original Buslee crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

Sebastiano Joseph Peluso

ENGINEER/TOP TURRET GUNNER Lenard Leroy Bryant, original Buslee crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

Lenard Leroy Bryant

BALL TURRET GUNNER George Francis McMann, Jr., Stanley Gilbert crew, KIA 9/28/1944

No photo available

TAIL GUNNER Gerald Lee Andersen, Joe Ross Carnes crew, KIA 9/28/1944

Gerald Lee Andersen

FLEXIBLE GUNNER George Edwin Farrar, original Buslee crew member, POW Stalag Luft IV

George Edwin Farrar

 

The Brodie crew aboard Lazy Daisy, 545th Bomb Squad

PILOT James Joseph Brodie, original Brodie crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

James Joseph Brodie

CO-PILOT Lloyd Oliver Vevle, original Brodie crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

Lloyd Oliver Vevlve

NAVIGATOR George Marshall Hawkins, Jr., original Brodie crew member, POW Obermassfeld Hospital #1249 (served Stalag 9-C)

No photo available

TOGGLIER Byron Leverne Atkins, James Chadwick crew, KIA 9/28/1944

No photo available

RADIO OPERATOR Donald William Dooley, from Group Headquarters, KIA 9/28/1944

Donald William Dooley

ENGINEER/TOP TURRET GUNNER Robert Doyle Crumpton, original Brodie crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

Robert Doyle Crumpton

BALL TURRET GUNNER Gordon Eugene Hetu, original Brodie crew member, KIA 9/28/1944

No photo available

TAIL GUNNER Wilfred Frank Miller, original Brodie crew member, POW Stalag Luft IV

No photo available

FLEXIBLE GUNNER Harry Allen Liniger, original Brodie crew member, POW Stalag Luft IV

Harry Allen Liniger

Fourteen out of the eighteen boys aboard the two B-17’s were lost that day. Not only did they leave behind grieving parents and siblings, but they also left behind at least five wives and three children.

I have connected with many children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, great-nieces, and great-nephews of these boys. If I have not connected with you yet, and you are related to any of them, please comment or e-mail me. If anyone can provide pictures of those I don’t have yet, that would be greatly appreciated. They all deserve to be honored for their service and their fight for our freedom.

Sortie reports provided by the 384th Bomb Group.

© Cindy Farrar Bryan and The Arrowhead Club, 2017

Floyd Martin Vevle

The story of the Vevle twin brothers in the 8th Air Force, continued…

To recap, Lloyd Vevle was a co-pilot in the 384th Bomb Group based in Grafton Underwood, England. Lloyd lost his life on the 384th’s September 28, 1944 mission to Magdeburg, Germany. Involved in a mid-air collision, Lloyd could not bail out of his B-17G and his body was recovered near Ostingersleben, Germany. His parents were likely notified of his death on January 28, 1945.

Less than 100 miles from Grafton Underwood, Lloyd’s twin brother, Floyd Vevle was part of the 390th Bomb Group of the 8th Air Force based in Framlingham, England. Floyd was co-pilot of the Alvin J. Morman crew.

On January 14th, 1945, the 390th Bomb Group flew a mission to Derben, Germany. The target was an underground oil storage depot. The Morman crew was aboard B-17G 44-8426 and was made up of:

  • Pilot, 1st Lt. Alvin J. Morman
  • Co-pilot, 1st Lt. Floyd M. Vevle
  • Navigator, 1st Lt. Jack A. Simon
  • Togglier/Nose Gunner, 1st Lt. Robert C. (or G.) Springborn
  • Radio Operator, T/Sgt. Robert G. Hehr
  • Top Turret/Engineer T/Sgt. Mario J. Manfredini
  • Ball Turret, S/Sgt. James F. Stieg
  • Tail Gunner, S/Sgt. Samuel W. Barton
  • Waist Gunner, S/Sgt. Leon J. Cousineau

Floyd Vevle crew photo

Nearing the I.P. (Initial Point of the bomb run) at about 1240 hours, their squadron was attacked by approximately one hundred German FW 190’s and ME 109’s in the area between 5300N-1200E and 5220N-1250E at about 1240 hours.

With information from the Missing Air Crew Report, MACR11719, I will try to piece together the series of events that took place aboard 44-8426.

As a result of the enemy aircraft attack, the interphone system of communication was disabled and a wing was on fire. The crew resorted to the use of signals to convey to each other that the ship was going down. Radio Operator, T/Sgt. Robert G. Hehr and Waist Gunner, S/Sgt. Leon J. Cousineau were either killed instantly or mortally wounded in the initial attack, or succumbed to anoxia (oxygen deprivation).

Tail Gunner S/Sgt. Samuel W. Barton bailed out first, likely from the tail gunner’s emergency exit. Reported by an unknown crewmember, Barton observed Cousineau before he left the ship and said Cousineau was in a daze.

Top Turret Gunner/Engineer T/Sgt. Mario J. Manfredini made his way to the front escape hatch where he met Co-pilot 1st Lt. Floyd M. Vevle. Vevle motioned Manfredini to bail out before him. Vevle, standing behind Manfredini, was wearing his parachute and was himself prepared to bail out. Manfredini noted that Pilot 1st Lt. Alvin J. Morman was “still at the controls trying to keep plane level when I jumped.” Morman was also observed wearing his chute. Manfredini does not know if Vevle followed him out, but reported that Navigator, 1st Lt. Jack A. Simon did follow him out and that Togglier/Nose Gunner, 1st Lt. Robert Springborn followed Simon.

Simon reported that “with the engineer [Manfredini] gone, I entered the escape hatch and stood up beside Lt. Vevle and verified by signs that we were going down (wing fire not visible from nose) and that he and the pilot, Lt. Morman were alright. With that information I left the ship. The togglier, Sgt. Springborn, leaving the ship only seconds later apparently, states that no one was standing in the escape hatch, and though from his position he could not be sure, he does not believe there was anyone in the pilots compartment. (From personal conversations later). The engineer [Manfredini] also verified at the time of his leaving the ship the pilot and co-pilot were uninjured.”

By this point, the following crew members have bailed out of the ship:

  • Tail Gunner, S/Sgt. Samuel W. Barton
  • Top Turret/Engineer T/Sgt. Mario J. Manfredini
  • Navigator, 1st Lt. Jack A. Simon
  • Togglier/Nose Gunner, 1st Lt. Robert Springborn

Surviving crew members believed that Vevle and Morman may have engaged the autopilot and gone to the rear of the ship to help other crewmen still on board.

Simon reported what happened next, information he gleaned from conversations with Ball Turret Gunner S/Sgt. James F. Stieg. Simon wrote, “Despite the visible fire, he [Stieg] remained at his position in the turret until he was wounded in the leg.”

Stieg continued the story. When Stieg emerged from the ball turret, he noted that Hehr “was wounded.  Last seen slumped over the radio table.  Being seriously wounded myself, I was unable to crawl to him.” Additionally, Manfredini reported that Stieg said Hehr was wedged between his table and chair. He was not trying to get loose, so Stieg thought that he was either dead or wounded severely and unable to get out of the plane. Stieg wrote that Cousineau “was fatally wounded by enemy aircraft.”

Simon continued: “Manning a waist gun against fighters which continued to attack, until wounded again, he [Stieg] then tried to get out the waist escape hatch, but was unable to get the door off, because the emergency release would not operate. He estimates this action consumed approximately fifteen minutes… Being unable to get out, and in a weakened condition, he endeavored to protect himself from flames then entering the fuselage when the ship blew up hurling him into space where he was able to parachute to safety.”

Stieg elaborated, “He [Cousineau] was fatally wounded by enemy aircraft. He was lying next to me on the waist floor prior to the ship’s nosing over and going down – but all of a sudden I heard an explosion and evidently it blew me clear.” After being blown out of the aircraft, Stieg parachuted to the ground near Potsdam. Ball Turret Gunner S/Sgt. James F. Stieg was the fifth and last crewman to leave the plane alive. When asked in the questionnaire if he bailed out, James F. Stieg wrote, “No – blown out and parachuted to safety.”

Simon continued, “Because of the erratic flight of the aircraft, he [Stieg] assumes that the ship was flying out of control. Although he did not go forward of the radio room, he feels that there was no one in the pilot’s compartment.” Though he didn’t feel anyone was in the pilot’s compartment, Stieg did not report seeing either Morman or Vevle in the waist. By this time, Morman and Vevle, if they had remained in the pilot’s compartment, may have been killed in the continuing attack or may have succumbed to anoxia.

Simon reported that “When I bailed out, I landed a few kilometers southeast of the small town of Freysach (spelling?) Germany. It is my understanding that Sgt. Manfredini, Sgt. Springborn, and Sgt. Barton all landed within a few miles radius.”

Barton, Manfredini, Simon, Springborn, and Stieg all became prisoners of war. Stieg was hospitalized. All of them eventually returned home.

Springborn “thought aircraft struck the ground in a small lake” and Manfredini “was told [the] plane exploded in air.” Stieg reported that the aircraft “struck the ground near Potsdam, Germany when it exploded.”

Cousineau, Hehr, Vevle, and Morman were assumed to be in the ship when it struck the ground or blown out when it exploded. Hehr and Cousineau were in the waist, Vevle and Morman may have still been in the cockpit. According to Stieg, Hehr and Cousineau were dead. The condition of Morman and Vevle was not known.

Simon reported that “The only additional information was obtained from the German colonel who interrogated me, who for some unexplainable reason called me in just before my release from the interrogation center to inform me of the disposition of my crew. According to his statement, the bodies of Lt. Vevle, Lt. Morman, Sgt. Cousineau and Sgt. Hehr were found in the airplane. The others were accounted for as prisoners of war except for Sgt. Stieg, regarding who whereabouts he was uninformed. At that time, it was later learned from Stg. Stieg, he was in a hospital in Berlin. It is possible that a more exact position of where the aircraft crashed may be obtained from Sgt. Stieg.” German authorities at the Interrogation Center told other survivors that Lt. Vevle, Lt. Morman, Sgt. Cousineau, and Sgt. Hehr were found in or near the wreckage of the airplane.

The questionnaire filled out by survivors of the crash asked each respondent to explain Pilot Lt. Morman’s fate in part or wholly on supposition. Responses included:

  • “By remaining at the cockpit site until reasonably sure that all had left the ship it is probable that successive fighter assaults reported by the lower turret gunner resulted in the pilot and co-pilot being hit and wounded badly or killed. This is purely an assumption.”
  • “Anoxia victim trying to help crew members while ship on auto pilot.”
  • “Believe he was trying to hold the plane in level flight so crew could get out.”

Responses to the same question regarding Co-pilot Lt. Vevle included:

  • “By remaining at the cockpit site until reasonably sure that all had left the ship it is probable that successive fighter assaults reported by the lower turret gunner resulted in the pilot and co-pilot being hit and wounded badly or killed. This is purely an assumption.”
  • “I was the last man to leave the ship and as I glanced back toward the pilots compartment I couldn’t see his feet. He must have going back in the ship succumbed from anoxia [deprivation of oxygen].”
  • “Believe that for some reason unknown to me he went back either to the cockpit or was trying to make his way back to the waist to warn other crew members since interphone and the alarm system were shot out.”

Responses regarding Waist Gunner Sgt. Cousineau included:

  • “Dead either from wounds or [lack of] oxygen.”
  • “Apparently killed by one of the initial assaults which put the plane out of control (fire).”

Responses regarding Radio Operator Sgt. Hehr included:

  • “Apparently killed by one of the initial assaults which put the plane out of control (fire).”

Manfredini also reported on the tragic death of a member of another 390th crew. “S/Sgt. [Victor] James Perrotta killed while trying to escape at Dulug Luft at Wetzlar, Germany.  Saw it happen.”

The entire squadron of eight aircraft, of which 44-8426 was a part, was lost. Killed aboard 44-8426 were:

  • Pilot, 1st Lt. Alvin J. Morman
  • Co-pilot, 1st Lt. Floyd M. Vevle
  • Radio Operator, T/Sgt. Robert G. Hehr
  • Wait Gunner, S/Sgt. Leon J. Cousineau

Taken prisoner and eventually returned home were:

  • Navigator, 1st Lt. Jack A. Simon
  • Togglier, 1st Lt. Robert C. (or G.) Springborn
  • Top Turret/Engineer T/Sgt. Mario J. Manfredini
  • Ball Turret, S/Sgt. James F. Stieg
  • Tail Gunner, S/Sgt. Samuel W. Barton

One source (http://www.fieldsofhonor-database.com/index.php/american-war-cemetery-henri-chapelle-v/50115-vevle-floyd-m) states that Floyd Vevle was initially buried at the Wachow Community Cemetery, but that after the war, his body could not be found.

Even though the German Colonel at the Interrogation Center reported that four bodies were found in the crash, MACR (Missing Air Crew Report) 17119 which covers the loss of the crew, does not report that his body was found at the crash site. MACR11719 shows that Robert G. Hehr, Leon J. Cousineau, and Alvin J. Morman were found dead near the place of the crash, 3.5 km west of Wachow and 20 km northeast of Brandenburg. Interment was January 16, 1945 in the community of Wachow. Floyd Vevle’s name was not included among the dead.

MACR11719 Page 18

MACR11719 Page 27

Within a 109-day period of WWII, Oliver Vevle lost both of his twin sons, Lloyd and Floyd. Both in the 8th Air Force. Both Co-pilots. Both killed in action over Germany. Floyd is still considered missing.

Floyd Vevle is memorialized on the Tablet of the Missing at the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery in Henri-Chapelle, Belgium. Floyd earned the Purple Heart and the Air Medal with 3 Oak Leaf Clusters.

Floyd’s twin brother, Lloyd Vevle of the 384th Bomb Group, is buried in Plot C, Row 37, Grave 20 at the Ardennes American Cemetery in Neupre, Belgium. Like his twin brother, Lloyd earned the Purple Heart and the Air Medal with 3 Oak Leaf Clusters.

Thank you to Keith Ellefson, combat data specialist for the 384th Bomb Group research group for providing me with a copy of MACR11719.

© Cindy Farrar Bryan and The Arrowhead Club, 2015

Lloyd Oliver Vevle

Oliver R. Vevle was born in Illinois in 1886. Both of Oliver’s parents were from Norway. Louise Cleveland was born in Illinois in 1884. Both of her parents were also from Norway. Oliver and Louise married on May 6, 1911 in Fort Dodge, Webster County, Iowa. Their first-born son, Rudolph (Rudy) Bernhardt Vevle, came along on October 22, 1912.

In 1920 (according to the federal census), Oliver and Louise Vevle lived at 334 7th Avenue North in Fort Dodge. Martha Cleveland, Louise’s mother, lived with Oliver and Louise. Oddly, Rudolph was not listed in the census record, possibly simply an oversight in recording the census. Oliver worked as a bank teller.

On December 9, 1922, twin sons Lloyd Oliver and Floyd Martin were born.

On October 19, 1925, Louise Vevle died at the age of 41, leaving her husband, Oliver, to raise their three sons. She was buried three days later, on October 22, Rudy’s thirteenth birthday. The twins, Lloyd and Floyd, had not yet reached their third birthday.

Almost four years later, on August 15, 1929, Oliver remarried. His new bride was Martha Elizabeth Richardson Vevle, born in Illinois in 1882. Like Oliver, her parents were born in Norway.

In 1930 (according to the federal census), Oliver and Martha and the rest of the Vevle family lived at 6th Avenue North in Fort Dodge. Oliver was a teller at a savings bank. At 17 years old, Rudolph worked as a grocery store clerk. The twins were 7. Martha was listed as Elizabeth M., so possibly she preferred to go by her middle name.

A 1940 census record for the family eludes my searches, but a 1940 city directory lists Lloyd as a student and Floyd as a salesman at L&L Department store. Their father, Oliver, was listed as a teller at the Fort Dodge National Bank. By the printing of the 1941 Fort Dodge city directory, Lloyd and Floyd were both listed as students. Both boys graduated from Port Washington High School in 1940.

Update, September 19, 2018

Thank you to Sarah Little, who found that a 1940 census record does exist for the Vevle family. Sarah gave me the enumeration district number, page number, and location for the record. After more research I discovered that Ancestry.com had transcribed their last name as Viole and the record was therefore not coming up in searches. In 1940, the Vevle family still lived on 6th Avenue North in Fort Dodge, Iowa. Oliver held the same job as in 1930 as a teller in a bank. Son Rudolph no longer lived at home, but Lloyd and Floyd, at 17 years old, did.

Lloyd Vevle, Senior class of 1940, Port Washington High School Yearbook photo

Lloyd Vevle, Senior class of 1940, Port Washington High School Yearbook photo

Lloyd’s high school strengths and accomplishments included:  English, History, Science, Mathematics, Wrestling, Debate, and Orchestra. His 1940 yearbook quote was “I am not a politician and my other habits are good.”

Floyd Vevle, Senior class of 1940, Port Washington High School Yearbook photo

Floyd Vevle, Senior class of 1940, Port Washington High School Yearbook photo

Floyd’s high school strengths and accomplishments included:  English, History, Science, Mathematics, Wrestling, Student Manager, Debate, and Orchestra. His 1940 yearbook quote was “Honor lies in honest toil.”

On April 7, 1942, oldest brother, Rudy, enlisted in WWII. His residence was noted as Cook County, Illinois, and his place of enlistment as Chicago. His enlistment record states that he was single and had two years of college. He served as a technical sergeant in the US Army.

On November 4, 1942, Floyd enlisted in the US Army Air Corps. His residence was noted as Webster County, Iowa, and his place of enlistment as Minneapolis, Minnesota. His enlistment record states that he was single and had two years of college.

January 31, 1943? Lloyd also enlisted in the US Army Air Corps, but his enlistment record raises some questions. His record states that he was born in 1908, not 1922. It does note his residence as Webster County, Iowa, but incorrectly shows his highest level of education was grammar school. His place of enlistment was noted as Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. His enlistment date was noted as January 31, 1943. Lloyd’s record also noted that he was a widower without dependents, although I have not found a marriage record for him.

Both boys, Lloyd and Floyd, became co-pilots in the 8th Air Force in WWII.

Lloyd was assigned to the 545th Bomb Squadron of the 384th Bomb Group (Heavy) on AAF Station 106 Special Orders #148 dated 26 July 1944, James Joseph Brodie Crew. The 384th was based in Grafton Underwood, England. Lloyd’s first mission was as Brodie’s co-pilot on the 384th’s Mission #174 to Dugny (Paris), France. The target was a German Air Force (Luftwaffe) fuel depot.

Lloyd earned the title of First Lieutenant by his nineteenth mission on September 28, 1944, the 384th’s Mission #201 to the Krupps Steel Manufacturing Plant in Magdeburg, Germany. It was on this mission that the Brodie crew’s aircraft, Lazy Daisy, collided with the John Oliver Buslee crew’s aircraft, Lead Banana, coming off the target at Magdeburg. Lloyd Oliver Vevle was one of the eighteen crew from both flying fortresses listed as missing in action.

Floyd was assigned to the 568th Bomb Squadron of the 390th Bomb Group. The 390th was based in Framlingham, England. (Framlingham is just shy of 100 miles from Grafton Underwood.) Ten days after Lloyd was declared missing, Floyd flew his first mission. Would Floyd have gotten word by then that his twin brother was missing in action? It was the 390th’s October 7, 1944 Mission #202 to Bohlen-Biefeld, Germany. Note that each bomb group had their own unique numbering system for missions. Also note that Lloyd’s last mission was #201 and Floyd’s first mission was #202.

Floyd Vevle crew photo

On January 14, 1945, Floyd flew his twenty-seventh mission with the 390th Bomb Group, Mission # 243 to Derben, Germany. He was aboard aircraft 42-8426. Floyd was killed on that mission and he still considered missing.

I estimate that the Oliver and Martha Elizabeth Vevle received word of Lloyd’s death in the September 28, 1944 mid-air collison around January 28, 1945, two weeks after his twin brother, Floyd, died. I base this date on the fact that the Buslee family learned of their son Jay’s death that date and because the identification of both Buslee and Vevle were reported on the same telegram form.

Rudy returned to the states on June 20, 1945, arriving in New York on the Queen Mary. He was released from the service on January 18, 1946.

Lloyd Vevle is buried in Plot C, Row 37, Grave 20 at the Ardennes American Cemetery in Neupre, Belgium. Lloyd earned the Purple Heart and the Air Medal with 3 Oak Leaf Clusters.

Lloyd Vevle grave marker, Ardennes American Cemetery in Neupre, Belgium

Lloyd Vevle grave marker, Ardennes American Cemetery in Neupre, Belgium

Floyd Vevle is memorialized on the Tablet of the Missing at the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery in Henri-Chapelle, Belgium. Like his twin brother, Floyd earned the Purple Heart and the Air Medal with 3 Oak Leaf Clusters.

In 1950, Oliver and Martha Elizabeth Vevle traveled abroad, possibly to visit Lloyd’s grave and find Floyd’s name on the Tablet of the Missing. A passenger list shows them returning on the Queen Elizabeth, leaving Southampton on September 29 and arriving New York October 4.

Oliver died in 1963. Martha Elizabeth died in 1987. Engraved on Oliver and Martha Elizabeth’s tombstone is:

In loving memory of our twin sons
Pilots – U.S. Army Air Corps – W.W. II
Lt. Lloyd O. (1922-1944) — Killed in combat, Mahgraten, Germany. Buried U.S. Military Cemetery Liege, Belgium.
Lt. Floyd M. (1922-1945) — Lost in combat over Berlin, Germany. Missing.

Vevle Tombstone - edited

Lloyd and Floyd’s older brother, Rudy, died on June 13, 2000 at the age of eighty-seven.

Note

The 390th Memorial Museum is located on the grounds of the Pima Air & Space Museum in Tucson, AZ. The 390th’s reunion will be held October 16-17, 2015 in Tucson. The 384th’s reunion will be held later that same month, also in Tucson. On Friday, Oct 30, 2015, the 384th reunion attendees will tour the Pima Air and Space Museum in Tucson. I am looking forward to visiting the 390th Memorial Museum during the reunion.

Links

http://www.384thbombgroup.com

http://www.390th.org

My next post will continue with more information on Floyd Vevle gleaned from MACR11719, the missing air crew report regarding his last mission with the 390th Bomb Group. I had hoped to include the information in this post, but due to a power outage from a large thunder storm sitting over central Florida, I could not finish the job Tuesday evening. Thank you to Keith Ellefson, combat data specialist for the 384th Bomb Group research group for providing me with a copy of MACR11719.

I know Floyd Vevle did not serve with the 384th and is therefore outside of the scope of my usual posts, but being he was Lloyd Vevle’s twin brother, I determined that the information about him was pertinent to the Vevle’s and the 384th’s story.

© Cindy Farrar Bryan and The Arrowhead Club, 2015