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2017 8th AF Reunion in New Orleans

On September 27, WWII veterans of the 8th Army Air Forces, family and friends gathered in New Orleans for the 2017 reunion of the 8th Air Force. It was a joyous occasion filled with the rekindling of old friendships and the making of new ones. Many of us met in person for the first time friends we had only known through the 384th’s Facebook group.

L to R: New friends Robin Long, John DeFrancesco, and Bill Wilkens
Photo courtesy of Cindy Farrar Bryan

One of those I met for the first time was Kevin Flecknor of the UK. Kevin maintains the 384th’s memorial and grounds in Grafton Underwood. I had previously only known Kevin through the 384th’s Facebook group.
Photo courtesy of Keith Ellefson.

It was also great to see old friends like Henry Sienkiewicz and Katie Cahill at the reunion
Photo courtesy of Cindy Farrar Bryan

Members of the 384th Volunteer team, left to right: Keith Ellefson, John Edwards, Marc Poole, and Fred Preller. We were all excited to meet Marc, the originator of 384thbombgroup.com, for the first time.
Photo courtesy of Cindy Farrar Bryan.

The 384th Bomb Group turned out in full force at the reunion with the highest attendance of any individual group with fifty-nine total registrants. Eight of our 384th veterans were on hand. These eight represented all four bomb squadrons of the 384th and represented all three years the 384th called Grafton Underwood home during WWII, from the first crews to arrive in Grafton Underwood to the last to depart after the final mission, Number 316.

384th Bomb Group Veterans attending the 2017 8th AF Reunion.
Left to Right: Hank Sienkiewicz, Don Hilliard, John DeFrancesco, Burnia Martin, Len Estrin, Dave Lustig, Bill Wilkens, and Peter Bielskis
Photo courtesy of Cindy Farrar Bryan

The first of these veterans to arrive in Grafton Underwood was…

Burnia Martin, a tail gunner on the Johnny Butler crew representing the 547th Bomb Squadron. Burnia flew fourteen missions, #1 through #24 from June 22, 1943 to September 16, 1943. On his fourteenth mission, Burnia’s B-17 was shot down by enemy aircraft. Burnia spent the remainder of the war as a POW.

Burnia Martin
Photo courtesy of the Quentin Bland Collection via the 384th Bomb Group photo gallery

Two of these veterans arrived in 1944…

Henry Sienkiewicz, a bombardier representing the 545th Bomb Squadron. Hank flew thirty-five missions, #150 through #256 from July 4, 1944 to January 17, 1945. (No wartime photo available).

John DeFrancesco, a pilot representing the 544th Bomb Squadron. John flew thirty-five missions, #208 through #253 from October 9, 1944 to January 8, 1945. John’s B-17 developed mechanical problems on his thirty-fifth mission and the crew was forced to bail out. John spent the remainder of the war as a POW.

John DeFrancesco
Photo courtesy of John DeFrancesco

Five of these veterans arrived at Grafton in early 1945…

Donald Hilliard, a radio operator representing the 545th Bomb Squadron. Don flew sixteen missions, #266 through #315 from February 14, 1945 to April 20, 1945.

Don Hilliard
Photo courtesy of Penny Probasco via Facebook

David Lustig, a radio operator representing the 547th Bomb Squadron. Dave flew twenty-two missions, #268 through #316 from February 19, 1945 to April 25, 1945.

David Lustig
Photo courtesy of Carl Lustig via Facebook

William Wilkens, an engineer/top turret gunner representing the 547th Bomb Squadron. Bill flew thirty missions, #273 through #316 from February 24, 1945 to April 25, 1945.

Bill Wilkens
Photo courtesy of the 384th Bomb Group photo gallery

Peter Bielskis, a ball turret gunner representing the 546th Bomb Squadron. Peter flew twenty-seven missions, #274 through #315 from February 25, 1945 to April 20, 1945.

Peter Bielskis, 1944
Photo courtesy of Patricia Haidys-Bielskis via Facebook

Leonard Estrin, a ball turret gunner representing the 546th Bomb Squadron. Len flew seventeen missions, #279 through #314 from March 2, 1945 to April 19, 1945.

Len Estrin
Photo courtesy of Len Estrin via the 384th Bomb Group Photo Gallery

With the addition of a co-pilot, navigator and waist gunner, we would have had a full crew!

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

There were a few early arrivals in New Orleans, but today was a travel day for most of us. My husband, Bill, and I, and veteran John DeFrancesco drove in from central Florida today. The 384th’s webmaster, Fred Preller, his brother-in-law, Sal Scalia, and Christopher Wilkinson had the 384th’s hospitality suite nicely set up for us and stocked with provisions. Our hospitality suite was a little off the beaten path and hard to find for visitors, but with our large group in attendance, we needed this bigger space, the Ponchatrain Room.

Keith Ellefson escorted Wingy to the reunion in New Orleans. Fred Preller (on left) and Sal Scalia (on right) lend a hand moving Wingy from her chariot to her place of honor in the 384th Bomb Group’s hospitality suite.
Photo courtesy of Keith Ellefson.

Everyone gathered in the Hilton’s ballroom at 6pm for the Welcome Reception. Afterwards, everyone dispersed into the individual hospitality suites to see who had arrived and who was still MIA.

L to R: Mark Meehl, Christopher Wilkinson, and Mariola Wilkinson
Photo courtesy of Cindy Farrar Bryan

Thursday, September 28, 2017

The reunion got off to a great start with the first of a two-day tour of the National WWII Museum in downtown New Orleans. Our first day included a viewing of the incredible 4D film “Beyond All Boundaries” narrated by Tom Hanks. We toured as many of the museum’s exhibits as we could cover, but were glad we would have a second day to be able to see everything.

384th BG veteran John DeFrancesco in front of one of the museum’s exhibits, American Invasion of Italy.
Photo courtesy of Keith Ellefson.

We spent a lot of time in the US Freedom Pavilion with the B-17E “My Gal Sal” and other WWII aircraft, and it would definitely require a second look on Friday. With several catwalks at different levels, we were able to have great views of the Flying Fortress from all angles. Touring the museum in the company of the men who flew those magnificent machines and fought in WWII made the experience even more special.

B-17 in the WWII Museum
Photo courtesy of Cindy Farrar Bryan

Aircraft suspended from the ceiling of the US Freedom Pavilion at the National WWII Museum in New Orleans
Photo courtesy of Cindy Farrar Bryan

On Thursday night, everyone gathered in the Hilton’s ballroom for a buffet dinner and program with two speakers from the National WWII Museum, President and CEO Stephen Watson, and Senior Director of Research and History Keith Huxen.

Four daughters of Stalag Luft IV POWs and 384th Bomb Group veteran John DeFrancesco gather for a photo at Thursday night’s dinner
Standing L to R: Laura Edge and Cindy Bryan
Seater L to R: Ellen Hartman, John DeFrancesco, and Candy Brown
Photo courtesy of Craig Dubishar, 8thAFHS Official Photographer

Friday, September 29, 2017

On Friday we returned to the museum for the opportunity to see all the exhibits we missed the first day. After covering all of the museum’s presentations of WWII history, we were drawn again to the Freedom Pavilion and the B-17.

Whenever I see a B-17, I picture my dad manning his machine gun in the waist window, and today was no different. To think that he was part of the great air war over Europe is sometimes hard for me to grasp.

Waist gunner at the ready in his B-17
Photo courtesy of Cindy Farrar Bryan

This man who taught me how to ride a bike and build a sand castle on the beach had to go to war when he was a young man. He had to risk his life and fight for what today I take for granted, my freedom. Visiting a museum dedicated to this war from long ago really makes me stop and think about the sacrifices my dad and the other veterans of this war and their families made for us. And it makes me wish my dad was still around to attend this reunion with me.

Dad (George Edwin Farrar) at Grafton Underwood, 1944
Photo courtesy of Cindy Farrar Bryan

On Friday night, each bomb group gathered in their separate hospitality suites for the Rendezvous Dinner. Frank Alfter, the group’s very first NexGen member, emceed. Christopher Wilkinson and Fred Preller made presentations. And all of us enjoyed the dinner and camaraderie of the evening.

Frank Alfter
Photo courtesy of Keith Ellefson

L to R: Don and Donna Hilliard, and Bill Wilkens
Photo courtesy of Cindy Farrar Bryan

L to R: Hedwig Lustig, Bill Wilkens, and Dave Lustig
Photo courtesy of Cindy Farrar Bryan

Saturday, September 30, 2017

On Saturday, reunion attendees were given the option of taking a New Orleans City Tour or touring the Oak Alley Plantation. John, Bill, and I opted for a more casual day starting with breakfast at Café du Monde, New Orleans’ original French Market coffee stand since 1862. Black coffee with chicory washed down a plate of Beignets covered with a mountain of powdered sugar.

By the time we returned to the hotel, the 384th’s hospitality suite was in full swing. We joined in until lunchtime when John, Bill, John Edwards, and I took a break to check out the Kenner Seafood Market for some good local seafood. Back to the hospitality suite for the afternoon and then a break before the veterans’ group photos and dinner.

WWII 8th AF Veterans Group Photo
Photo courtesy of Craig Dubishar

8th Air Force Veterans attending the 2017 Reunion who were POWs during WWII
Photo courtesy of Michael Carr

The reunion’s gala dinner banquet was held at the National WWII Museum in the US Freedom Pavilion right underneath the B-17 suspended from the ceiling. What better venue for veterans of the 8th Air Force than dining under a WWII Flying Fortress! Over five hundred attended the banquet and we were entertained by the New Orleans singing group, the “Vintage Vocals.”

Gala Banquet at the WWII Museum
Photo courtesy of Bill Bryan

Sunday, October 1, 2017

Most folks, including Bill, John, and I, headed home Sunday morning. I think whether driving or flying, all were thinking about the announcement of the 8th Air Force Historical Society’s reunion plans for next year on their return trip home. It is scheduled for October 10 – 14, 2018 in Dayton, Ohio. The National Museum of the USAF is located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and will be one of the reunion’s star attractions, second only to the main attraction, the group’s WWII veterans. Hope to see you there!

© Cindy Farrar Bryan and The Arrowhead Club, 2017 (with the exception of the photos of others)

2017 8th Air Force Reunion – A Teaser

I had hoped to be able to tell you all about the 8th Air Force Reunion that I attended last week, but I have barely had time to unpack and rest up from my excellent adventure in New Orleans with veterans, family, and friends of the 384th Bomb Group and other groups of the 8th. It will just have to wait until next week! For now, I’ll just leave you with this teaser…

Over five hundred folks attended the reunion, including seventy-five WWII veterans and eight former POW’s, two of which represented the 384th Bomb Group.

Eight 384th Bomb Group Veterans attended the reunion…

384th Bomb Group Veterans attending the 2017 8th AF Reunion.
Left to Right: Hank Sienkiewicz, Don Hilliard, John DeFrancesco, Burnia Martin, Len Estrin, Dave Lustig, Bill Wilkens, and Peter Bielskis

Seventy-five 8th AF Veterans attended (I don’t think they all made it into this photo)…

8th Air Force Veterans attending the 2017 Reunion.

And eight of the veterans attending were former POWs including the 384th’s John DeFrancesco and Burnia Martin…

8th Air Force Veterans attending the 2017 Reunion who were POWs during WWII (Burnia Martin sits third from left and John DeFrancesco sits fifth from left).

Check back next week for more details about the reunion.

© Cindy Farrar Bryan and The Arrowhead Club, 2017

Road Trip to the Big Easy

Today I am on the road. John DeFrancesco, WWII Veteran of the 8th Air Force and 384th Bomb Group, my husband Bill, and I are heading to New Orleans. By this evening, we will be in the company of many other WWII Veterans of the 8th Air Force, and their families and friends. I’m looking forward to reuniting with old friends and making new ones.

It is the first day of our 2017 Reunion, which opens tonight with a Welcome Reception. We have three more days to look forward to with tours of the National World War II Museum, New Orleans City Tour, and Plantation Tour. We also have special dinners to anticipate – an 8th Air Force dinner buffet and speaker, an intimate Rendezvous Dinner with everyone dining with their individual bomb group, and the Gala Dinner and Program at the World War II Museum at the end of the week.

This year will probably be one of the largest turnouts for an 8th Air Force Reunion as we all gather in New Orleans. The Veterans, their spouses, NexGen (Next Generation) family, and friends who will meet this week to remember the Mighty Eighth represent 8th AF HQ (Headquarters), the Museum of the Mighty Eighth Air Force in Savannah, Georgia, and over thirty bombardment and fighter groups of the 8th Air Force which were based in England during WWII.

B-17 Heavy Bombardment Groups

  • 91st Bomb Group, based in Bassingbourn
  • 92nd Bomb Group, based in Podington
  • 95th Bomb Group, based in Horham
  • 96th Bomb Group, based in Snetterton Heath
  • 100th Bomb Group, based in Thorpe Abbotts
  • 303rd Bomb Group, based in Molesworth
  • 305th Bomb Group, based in Chelveston
  • 306th Bomb Group, based in Thurleigh
  • 351st Bomb Group, based in Polebrook
  • 379th Bomb Group, based in Kimbolton
  • 381st Bomb Group, based in Ridgewell
  • 384th Bomb Group, based in Grafton Underwood
  • 385th Bomb Group, based in Great Ashfield
  • 401st Bomb Group, based in Deenethorpe
  • 447th Bomb Group, based in Rattlesden
  • 452nd Bomb Group, based in Deopham Green

B-24 Heavy Bombardment Groups

  • 34th Bomb Group, based in Mendlesham
  • 44th Bomb Group, based in Shipdham
  • 389th Bomb Group, based in Hethel
  • 392nd Bomb Group, based in Wendling
  • 445th Bomb Group, based in Tibenham
  • 446th Bomb Group, based in Bungay
  • 448th Bomb Group, based in Seething
  • 453rd Bomb Group, based in Old Buckenham
  • 458th Bomb Group, based in Horsham St. Faith
  • 466th Bomb Group, based in Attlebridge
  • 487th Bomb Group, based in Lavenham
  • 489th Bomb Group, based in Halesworth
  • 491st Bomb Group, based in Metfield
  • 493rd Bomb Group, based in Debach

B-26 Marauders Medium Bombardment Group

  • 386th Bomb Group, based in Snetterton Heath, Boxted, and Great Dunmow

Fighter Groups

  • 352nd Fighter Group, based in Bodney, Norfolk
  • 479th Fighter Group, based in Wattisham

We will mix and mingle in the hospitality suites and listen to many stories of courage and determination in the face of a long ago enemy.

From previous reunions, I know I will marvel at these men, now in their nineties, who in their teens and early twenties, fought for us in WWII and won our freedom. When I look these ninety-something-year-old Veterans in the eye, their wrinkles disappear, their backs straighten, and I can see directly into their past, see the boys from long ago who were warriors, patriots, and heroes.

It is as though time travel were possible and I am ducking flak and dodging German fighter bullets as I listen to the recollection of a particularly rough mission. I am not standing in an air-conditioned New Orleans hotel hospitality suite. I am in the skies over Germany and I am afraid. I am there because they are there. They will tell me what they experienced all those years ago as if it were yesterday. I don’t want to miss a word.

© Cindy Farrar Bryan and The Arrowhead Club, 2017